COMO ESCUCHAR LA MUSICA AARON COPLAND PDF

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What to Listen for in Music by Aaron Copland. Alan Rich Foreword and Epilogue. In this fascinating analysis of how to listen to music intelligently, Aaron Copland raises two basic questions: Are you hearing everything that is going on?

Are you really being sensitive to it?

If you cannot answer yes to both questions, you owe it to yourself to read this book. Whether you listen to Mozart or Duke Ellington, Aaron Copland’s provocative suggestions for li In this fascinating analysis of how to listen to music intelligently, Aaron Copland raises two basic questions: Whether you listen to Mozart or Duke Ellington, Aaron Copland’s provocative suggestions for listening to music from his point of musics will bring you a deeper appreciation of the most rewarding of all art forms.

Paperbackpages. Published November 5th by Signet Classics first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about What to Listen for in Musicplease sign up. I read this book on kindle but need to quote a passage from chapter 7, about Debussy and timbre: I didn’t find the book on any library here nor a reference online I could search. Can anyone help me with the page number from a paperback or hardback edition any edition will do? Michelle You don’t need the paperback page number, you need to learn how to cite electronic sources.

What to Listen for in Music

As we move into a an age where we don’t kill trees to make …more You don’t musicaa the paperback page number, you need to learn how to cite electronic sources. As we move into a an age where we don’t kill trees to make paper to print books, students will have more and more of their resources in electronic form, rather than printed. The method for citation is slightly different, but not difficult to learn.

Here is a good resource for you: This will help you in the long run, rather than simply supplying an answer to a aaaron question about a page number.

What to Listen for in Music by Aaron Copland

See all 3 questions about What to Listen for in Music…. Lists with This Book. Sep 23, Jana Light rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a fantastic book for the layperson who wants to become a more intelligent listener and who wants to understand more of what is going on in classical copand note: Copland begins with an explanation of what music is and how it functions, moves to instruments, then to forms, adds an apologist chapter for contemporary music, and finishes with a chapter of what it means to be a good listener and the very significant role listeners play in t This is a fantastic book for the layperson who wants to become a more intelligent listener and excuchar wants to understand more of what is going on in classical music vopland Copland begins with an explanation of what music is and how it functions, moves to instruments, then to forms, adds an apologist chapter for contemporary coplajd, and finishes with a chapter of aarpn it means to be a good listener and the very significant role listeners play in the participation of the music creation.

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As a book for the layperson, I think it’s wonderful. It’s smart, detailed, comprehensive, and Copland punctuates his objective analyses with stirring descriptions of the emotional impact of music that remind readers how evanescent and mysterious good music is. It was a real joy to read a work by someone who can describe so well the technical aspects of music, but in a way that refuses to reduce music to something entirely tangible.

Muica never loses emphasis on the l of music and the rather inexplicability of why good music sounds and “feels” so good to us. As a decidedly non-layperson to the music world, I found myself skimming the beginning theory sections. The chapters on forms were a fantastic refresher, however sorry, long-lost college music theory textbooksand I enjoyed his discussions of music aaroon throughout. We may never like it, but it contains riches that deserve our effort and appreciation, like any other period and form.

Copland suggestively defines music as a language for emotions that are inexpressible in written or spoken language. That starts with a greater understanding of the technical aaon of music and composition which Copland has provided and culminates in being able to simply let a piece – no matter how “formless” and atonal – happen, giving it the freedom to create nostalgia, to re create an emotional experience that envelops us for 10 minutes or three hours.

Reading Copland, you wonder why more people don’t fully engage their intellect with music. It has so much to offer, and we have so much to offer as listeners.

Music really is “one of the glories of mankind. I had intended to listen as I went along, but when I realized I wouldn’t finish the book esuchar summer if I kept up with that model, I decided to finish the book and then spend the next few months listening to each piece after a brief refresher of its chapter context. I highly recommend every reader do something similar. It is no good only reading about music; to know music you obviously must listen to it and Copland has provided a mudica of selections for that purpose.

View all 3 comments. Aaron Copland stands as one of the giants of American composers. Charged by his French music teacher to produce an authentic American style of music, he would compose classics such as Appalachian SpringBilly the Kidand Rodeo.

Copland also would conduct, teach, and write over the course of his prodigious career. Based on a series of lectures and first published inWhat to Listen for in Music remains in print.

Along with his compositions which are still being performed, this b Aaron Copland stands as one of the giants of American composers. Copland illustrates his point by noting three modes of listening to music: He describes the sensuous plane as listening to music simply for the pleasure of the music itself.

This might include listening to music while driving or turning it on at home for background noise. The expressive plane implies listening to music in order to discern its meaning. While Copland acknowledges that music does, in fact, have meaning, he dissuades the listener from attaching too firm a meaning to any given piece of work.

For the feelings or emotion evoked at one time may coplanf quite different when listening to the same piece of music at a later time. It is to the third plane—the purely musical plane—that Copland directs the reader. Going beyond the joy and expressive power, this plane involves the melodies, rhythms, harmonies, and timbre of music.

This type of listening requires far greater attention and awareness to the underlying structure of the musical notes themselves. The highest level of intelligent listening, then, is the concerted effort of sustained active listening.

Copland makes generous references to examples of actual pieces of music that illustrate the points he is making. He also includes brief sections of the musical notes for those who have the ability to read music. One of the most endearing aspects of Copland is his ecsuchar on the necessity of listening to and appreciating various genres of music. It might also serve well to clarify certain parts of the structure of music for one who already is well seasoned but lacks the knowledge of a professional musician.

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It might be helpful for those who, like me can neither read music nor recognize pitch, to supplement Copland either before or after with a work on the general history of Western music. Anyone who does choose to read What to Listen for in Musichowever, will emerge a far better listener even if another music book is never touched. Oct 05, Jee Koh rated it really liked it. A basic and helpful introduction to music for someone like ka, i.

In this book first written in the s, Copland coplannd between listening on a sensuous plane mere enjoyment of the quality of sound and on expressive and secuchar musical planes. While not slighting the first, he contends that a better understanding of music increases our pleasure in it.

Knowledge en A basic and helpful introduction to music for someone like pa, i. Knowledge enhances passion, as I try rather vainly to persuade my students about poetry. A chapter is devoted to each of the four elements of music: There are also chapters on traditional music forms, such as sections, fugues, and sonatas, as well as on free forms.

Short passages of score illustrate the point made. They are often from Beethoven, probably because he is most familiar to the reader, but also because he ranks very high in Copland’s pantheon. As to be expected from a contemporary composer, Copland makes a pitch for modern music: To illustrate “free” forms, Copland, rather surprisingly, refers to Bach.

Bach wrote a good many preludes very often followed by a balancing fugue many of which are in “free” form. It was these that Busoni pointed to as an example of the path that he thought music esfuchar take. Bach achieved a unity of design in these “free” preludes either by adopting a pattern of well-defined character or by a clear progression of chordal harmonies which lead one from the beginning of a piece to the end without utilizing any repetition of thematic materials.

Often, both methods are combined. By these means Bach engenders a feeling of free fantasy and a bold freedom of design that aaaron be impossible to achieve within a strict form.

When one hears them, the conviction grows that Busoni was quite right in saying that the future problems of handling form in music are bound up with this Bach-like freedom in form. There is a chapter on opera and music drama, in which he lines up the composers on opposing sides based on whether they exalt the word or the music. Wagner he praises for his music, but deplores for his cmoo and words: A chapter on film music, a genre Copland himself wrote, focuses on the process of composition and collaboration.

A good part of the book’s fascination for me lies in this insider’s point of view, the perspective of the maker. In an introductory section, Copland defends the “expressiveness” of music against the proponents of “pure” music. That defence seems to rest on the idea of authorial intention.

The composer escucyar upon a musical theme and develops it the way he does because he wishes to express “something” through the music. Though that “something” is necessarily general, like an emotion, it matters as what the composer wishes to communicate to his listeners. Copland urges the reader to listen for “the long aqron the path along which a escucnar of music develops, and finally coheres.

He describes la grande ligne this way: